Tag: Norse mythology

Tolkien’s ‘The Lord of the Rings’ Mythical Realms Inspired From Real World

J.R.R. Tolkien’s mythical universe with all of its realms as depicted in four of his high fantasy novels, namely ‘The Hobbit‘ (1937) and ‘The Lord of the Rings‘ trilogy (1954-55), was actually inspired from real world locations in Europe and its vicinity. A superimposed detailed map of the Middle Earth and of the European continent…


The Complex Norse Mythology: The Gods Of The Norsemen

Before Christianity was officially introduced to Scandinavia in the 12th century, its inhabitants had their own ancient polytheistic religion which orbited around a series of complex mythical figures such as Odin, Thor, Loki, Freya, Sif, Ullr, Skaði, and many others. The Norse mythology comprises the totality of myths passed on from generation to generation since Ancient…


A Brief Overview On The Scandinavian Folklore And The Norse Mythology

The Scandinavian folklore represents the entirety of myths, customs, traditions, legends, fables, and superstitions which stem from the Norse mythology and are shared by the Nordic countries of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands. In spite of the fact that Iceland and the Faroe Islands are not geographically located in Scandinavia, due to…


10 Viking Facts You Should Know About Thor

Thor is one of the most important divinities in the Norse mythology. He is often associated with the symbols of lightning, thunder, storm, fertility and strength. In addition, he is responsible for the protection of humankind and is an Æsir god. The Icelandic medieval manuscripts (i.e. sagas) provide considerable details concerning the Norse mythology which was…


Huldufólk (Elves) In Icelandic And Faroese Folklores

In Icelandic and Faroese folktales, the ‘hidden people’ (or ‘Huldufólk’ as they are known in both Icelandic and Faroese) are supernatural beings that reside in, beneath or behind the rocks. The term ‘huldufólk’ is a synonym of ‘álfar’ (meaning ‘elves’), and has been in use since at least the beginning of the 19th century in Icelandic folklore….